SMiThaYe

AIDA64 v3.xx Benchmark Results Comparison

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AIDA64 V3.00.2500 (Extreme Edition)

Official website

 

Right, new benchmark chaps and that makes previous numbers irrelevant, post your benchmark figures here for fun (using only version 3.00.2500) and I'll include them into the table for comparison. Download site is here and my cloud backup is at the bottom of this post.

 

To run go to Menu > Benchmark > [name] > then press F5 to run. Tip: You may want to run it 3 times then post your highest score.

 

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AIDA64 is designed to run on 32-bit and 64-bit Microsoft Windows operating systems, and it fully supports Microsoft Windows 95, 98, Me, NT 4.0 SP6, 2000, XP, 2003, Vista, 2008, Windows 7, Windows 8, and 2012. AIDA64 has exceptionally low system resource requirements (minimum 486 processor with 32 MB RAM).

 

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Version 3.00.2500

  • Multi-threaded cache and memory bandwidth benchmarks with AVX2, AVX and SSE optimizations
  • Block-random cache and memory latency benchmark
  • Optimized 64-bit benchmarks for AMD “Kabini” and “Temash” APUs
  • AVX2 and FMA optimized 64-bit benchmarks for Intel “Haswell” processors
  • Preliminary support for L4 cache of Intel “Crystal Well” processors
  • Crucial M500, OCZ Vertex 450 SSD support
  • GPU details for AMD Radeon HD 7990 “Malta” and nVIDIA GeForce 700 Series

FEATURES:


Generic features
  • Low-level hardware information: 47 pages
  • Software and operating system information: 46 pages
  • Security related information: 6 pages
  • DirectX information including Direct3D acceleration features
  • Diagnostics module that simplifies troubleshooting
  • Tweaking features
  • Automatic online update

Benchmarking features

  • 13 benchmark modules to measure CPU, FPU and memory performance
  • Multi-threaded cache and memory bandwidth benchmarks with AVX2, AVX and SSE optimizations [*NEW*]
  • Block-random cache and memory latency benchmark [*NEW*]
  • Benchmark reference results to compare measured performance to other systems
  • Cache & Memory Benchmark Suite with L4 cache support [*NEW*]
  • Hard disk, optical drive and flash drive benchmarking with RAID array support

Unique features

  • UpTime and DownTime statistics with critical errors counter
  • Monitor Diagnostics to check the capabilities of CRT and LCD displays
  • System Stability Test with thermal monitoring to stress CPU, FPU, APU, memory, caches, disks and GPUs
  • Hardware Monitoring to monitor system temperatures and voltages on the System Tray, OSD, Vista Sidebar or Logitech keyboard LCD
  • SensorPanel with 3D bars, graphs and gauges
  • Temperature, voltage and fan RPM data logging to HTML and CSV log files
  • Overheating, voltage drop, overvoltage and cooling fan failure detection
  • High Definition Audio and OpenAL sound card details
  • AMD Stream, Direct3D Compute Shader, nVIDIA CUDA, OpenCL GPGPU device information
  • Smart Battery information
  • Web links: IT portals, software and driver download
  • Manufacturer links: product information, driver, firmware, and BIOS download
  • Hardware information database for over 156,000 devices
  • Overclock information
  • Fully localized user interface: 35+ languages
  • No installation or setup procedure required

 

And if you want to know all about the tests ran here it's detailed below

  • Memory Read - This benchmark measures the maximum achievable memory read bandwidth. The code behind this benchmark method is written in Assembly and it is extremely optimized for every popular AMD, Intel and VIA processor core variants by utilizing the appropriate x86/x64, x87, MMX, MMX+, 3DNow!, SSE, SSE2, SSE4.1, AVX, and AVX2 instruction set extension. For each processing thread the benchmark reads a 64 MB sized, 64 KB aligned data buffer from system memory into the CPU. Memory is read continuously without breaks, using 4 KB page size.
    [*NEW*] Since AIDA64 v3.00, the test is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.
     
  • Memory Write - This benchmark measures the maximum achiveable memory write bandwidth. The code behind this benchmark method is written in Assembly and it is extremely optimized for every popular AMD, Intel and VIA processor core variants by utilizing the appropriate x86/x64, x87, MMX, MMX+, 3DNow!, SSE, SSE2, SSE4.1, and AVX instruction set extension. For each processing thread the benchmark writes a 64 MB sized, 64 KB aligned data buffer from the CPU into the system memory. Memory is written continuously without breaks, using 4 KB page size.
    [*NEW*] Since AIDA64 v3.00, the test is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.
     
  • Memory Copy - This benchmark measures the maximum achiveable memory copy speed. The code behind this benchmark method is written in Assembly and it is extremely optimized for every popular AMD, Intel and VIA processor core variants by utilizing the appropriate x86/x64, x87, MMX, MMX+, 3DNow!, SSE, SSE2, SSE4.1, AVX, and AVX2 instruction set extension. For each processing thread the benchmark copies a 32 MB sized, 64 KB aligned data buffer into another 32 MB sized, 64 KB aligned data buffer through the CPU. Memory is copied continuously without breaks, using 4 KB page size.
    [*NEW*] Since AIDA64 v3.00, the test is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.
     
  • Memory Latency - This benchmark measures the typical delay when the CPU reads data from system memory. Memory latency time means the penalty measured from the issuing of the read command until the data arrives to the integer registers of the CPU. The code behind this benchmark method is written in Assembly, and uses at least 16 MB memory size with 4 KB page size.
    [*NEW*] Since AIDA64 v3.00, memory is accessed in a random pattern, with at least 128-byte stride to avoid the effect of the adjacent cacheline prefetcher; and smaller stride than the TLB-window to minimize the effect of TLB miss penalty.
    Memory Latency benchmark test uses only the basic x86 instructions and utilizes only one processor core and one thread.
     
  • CPU Queen - This simple integer benchmark focuses on the branch prediction capabilities and the misprediction penalties of the CPU. It finds the solutions for the classic "Queens problem" on a 10 by 10 sized chessboard [link]. At the same clock speed theoretically the processor with the shorter pipeline and smaller misprediction penalties will attain higher benchmark scores. For example -- with HyperThreading disabled -- the Intel Northwood core processors get higher scores than the Intel Prescott core based ones due to the 20-step vs 31-step long pipeline. However, with enabled HyperThreading the picture is controversial, because due to architectural bottlenecks the Northwood core runs out of internal resources and slows down. Similarly, at the same clock speed AMD K8 class processors will be faster than AMD K7 ones due to the improved branch prediction capabilities of the K8 architecture. CPU Queen test uses integer MMX, SSE2 and SSSE3 optimizations. It consumes less than 1 MB system memory and it is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.
     
  • CPU PhotoWorxx - This integer benchmark performs different common tasks used during digital photo processing.
    It performs the following tasks on a large RGB image:
    · Fill the image with random coloured pixels 
    · Rotate 90 degrees CCW 
    · Rotate 180 degrees (a.k.a. Flip) 
    · Difference 
    · Color space conversion (a.k.a. RGB32 to YV12 conversion, used e.g. during JPEG conversion)
    This benchmark stresses the SIMD integer arithmetic execution units of the CPU and also the memory subsystem. CPU PhotoWorxx test uses the appropriate x87, MMX, MMX+, 3DNow!, 3DNow!+, SSE, SSE2, SSSE3, SSE4.1, SSE4A, AVX, AVX2, and XOP instruction set extension, and it is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware. [*NEW*] Since AIDA64 v3.00, the PhotoWorxx benchmark implements AVX2 optimizations, and supports AMD Kabini and Intel Haswell processors.
     
  • CPU ZLib - This integer benchmark measures combined CPU and memory subsystem performance through the public ZLib compression library Version 1.2.5 [link]. CPU ZLib test uses only the basic x86 instructions, and it is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.
     
  • CPU AES - This integer benchmark measures CPU performance using AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) data encryption. In cryptography AES is a symmetric-key encryption standard. AES is used in several compression tools today, like 7z, RAR, WinZip, and also in disk encryption solutions like BitLocker, FileVault (Mac OS X), TrueCrypt. CPU AES test uses the appropriate x86, MMX and SSE4.1 instructions, and it's hardware accelerated on VIA PadLock Security Engine capable VIA C3, VIA C7, VIA Nano, and VIA QuadCore processors; and on Intel AES-NI instruction set extension capable processors. The test is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.
    [*NEW*] Since AIDA64 v3.00, the AES benchmark supports AMD Kabini and Intel Haswell processors.
     
  • CPU Hash - This integer benchmark measures CPU performance using the SHA1 hashing algorithm defined in the Federal Information Processing Standards Publication 180-4 [link]. The code behind this benchmark method is written in Assembly, and it is optimized for every popular AMD, Intel and VIA processor core variants by utilizing the appropriate MMX, MMX+/SSE, SSE2, SSSE3, AVX, AVX2, XOP, BMI, and BMI2 instruction set extension. This benchmark is hardware accelerated on VIA PadLock Security Engine capable VIA C7, VIA Nano and VIA QuadCore processors.
    In this benchmark every thread is working on independent 8 KB data blocks, and the MMX, SSE2, SSSE3, AVX, and XOP optimized calculation routines implement the latest vectorization idea of Intel [link].
    [*NEW*] Since AIDA64 v3.00, the Hash benchmark implements AVX2, BMI and BMI2 optimizations, and supports AMD Kabini and Intel Haswell processors.
     
  • FPU VP8 - This benchmark measures video compression performance using the Google VP8 (WebM) video codec Version 1.1.0 [link]. FPU VP8 test encodes 1280x720 pixel ("HD ready") resolution video frames in 1-pass mode at 8192 kbps bitrate with best quality settings. The content of the frames are generated by the FPU Julia fractal module. The code behind this benchmark method utilizes the appropriate MMX, SSE2, SSSE3 or SSE4.1 instruction set extension, and it is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.
     
  • FPU Julia - This benchmark measures the single precision (also known as 32-bit) floating-point performance through the computation of several frames of the popular "Julia" fractal. The code behind this benchmark method is written in Assembly, and it is extremely optimized for every popular AMD, Intel and VIA processor core variants by utilizing the appropriate x87, 3DNow!, 3DNow!+, SSE, AVX, AVX2, FMA, and FMA4 instruction set extension.
    FPU Julia test consumes 4 MB system memory per calculation thread, and it is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.
    [*NEW*] Since AIDA64 v3.00, the Julia benchmark implements AVX2 and FMA optimizations, and supports AMD Kabini and Intel Haswell processors.
     
  • FPU Mandel - This benchmark measures the double precision (also known as 64-bit) floating-point performance through the computation of several frames of the popular "Mandelbrot" fractal. The code behind this benchmark method is written in Assembly, and it is extremely optimized for every popular AMD, Intel and VIA processor core variants by utilizing the appropriate x87, SSE2, AVX, AVX2, FMA, and FMA4 instruction set extension.
    FPU Mandel test consumes 4 MB system memory per calculation thread, and it is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.
    [*NEW*] Since AIDA64 v3.00, the Mandel benchmark implements AVX2 and FMA optimizations, and supports AMD Kabini and Intel Haswell processors.
     
  • FPU SinJulia - This benchmark measures the extended precision (also known as 80-bit) floating-point performance through the computation of a single frame of a modified "Julia" fractal. The code behind this benchmark method is written in Assembly, and it is extremely optimized for every popular AMD, Intel and VIA processor core variants by utilizing trigonometric and exponential x87 instructions.
    FPU SinJulia test consumes 256 KB system memory per calculation thread, and it is HyperThreading, multi-processor (SMP) and multi-core (CMP) aware.

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Thanks for the update Smith!

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